Category: Swelling & Coma’s

What is a coma?

A coma is a state of deep unconsciousness where the person cannot by aroused. It is generally characterized by the absence of spontaneous eye movements, response to painful stimuli, and vocalization. Loss of consciousness typically involves injuries to the brain stem, the oldest part of the brain, which is responsible for basic life functions such as alertness, arousal, heartbeat, and breathing. Read more

What causes coma in head injured people?

The word coma is a Greek word that translates to ‘deep sleep’, and is currently used to indicate prolonged states of unconsciousness. Coma is a specific neurobehavioral diagnostic term that denotes unarousability (with the absence of sleep/wake cycles on electroencephalogram (EEG) and the loss of the capacity for environmental interaction). The cause typically consists of severe, diffuse bilateral brain damage and/or brain stem injury. Read more

What is brain swelling?

Brain swelling or edema is one of the types of ‘what we call secondary, mechanisms of brain damage, which commonly occur following an acquired brain injury. While the primary mechanisms of damage occur immediately at the moment of the injury, secondary mechanisms of damage tend to occur later and may be due to bleeding from damaged blood vessels (hemorrhage), and/or increased pressure within the brain (intracranial pressure) as the brain swells with fluid (edema or hydrocephalus) or blood. Secondary damage occurs more commonly after a severe brain injury. Read more

Children with Traumatic Brain Injuries

The number of children and adolescents in this country sustaining traumatic brain injuries is staggering. Each year one million …

What are seizures?

The terms epilepsy and seizure are often confined. On the one hand, a seizure is the resulting behavior or set of behaviors, …

Can seizures be controlled?

Treatment of epileptic seizures is usually accomplished through medication management. Antiepileptic medications work by …